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Coquille River (Bullards) Bridge

Bullard's Grave Bridge

Spanning the Coquille River just north of Bandon, the Coquille River Bridge, known locally as Bullards Bridge, takes its name from Bullards ferry that once operated there. It is one of only two steel vertical lift spans remaining along the Oregon Coast. The bridge stands as the most prominent remaining monument for a unique and nearly forgotten Oregon historical site, the little town of Bullards, whose development and demise are linked to this Coquille River crossing.

The Coquille River Bridge has a steel thrugh truss with a vertical lift.

The Coquille River Bridge has a steel thrugh truss with a vertical lift.

The Bullard family cemetery lies near the bridge.

The Bullard family cemetery lies near the bridge.

Robert W. Bullard, for whom the bridge is named, migrated to Coos County from Winnesheik County, Iowa, in 1877. In 1882 Bullard established a general store and ferry that operated from the north bank of the Coquille River, where the northern approach to the bridge is now located.

The last vestige of the community of Bullards now resides in Bullards State Park, located on the west side of the highway at the north end of the bridge, accessed by Old Ferry Lane. On a lonely hillside at the north end of the park sits a diminutive cemetery bearing the gravestones of three related pioneer families. Robert Bullard is buried here along with his wife, Malinda, a descendant of the Hamblocks and Longs, two of their six children, and other relatives.